Stop Cancer Introduction

Lying still,
Breathing in, breathing out,
Healthy cells grow all by themselves.
I am free of cancer!

white-blood-cell-543471_1280This Zen poem came to me during my guided imagery session on the day of the Vernal Equinox, 1997. It represents the theme of this category (Stop Cancer): Healthy Cells Grow All By Themselves. We have to be willing to allow our bodies to heal themselves by paying attention to our healing process, by paying attention to our breathing. We have to live moment by moment.

This category is devoted to cancer patients in general and bladder cancer patients in particular. It traces the symptoms and diagnosis of my bladder cancer from the onset of symptoms to Father’s Day, 1997 and beyond. It is given in frequent articles in diary format so that other sufferers of the disease or any other disease can make use of my experience in whatever way is beneficial to them. Hopefully, my readers will be inspired to take an active role in their own recovery and be willing to participate in their own healing, rather than being at the mercy of the surgeon’s knife. There is a considerable body of evidence that patients who have a positive mental attitude and engage in their own treatment have much better chance of long term survival.

Not everyone will want to do the amount of research I’ve done to find out about my disease, but if you do, the articles in Stop Cancer should give you a good idea of where to start and what resources are available to help you participate in your on healing. I have incorporated a lot of alternative medicine and spiritual practices in my recovery, and I hope to inspire you to do the same.

There are a few bits of background information that you should know in order to understand my motivation for doing this in the way that it is being done. First of all, I was a 57 year old male living in Marin County, California, one of the best places to live in the world, both from a pure aesthetic point of view, and because of its access to medical resources. The University of California at San Francisco Medical Center is just across the Golden Gate Bridge, and Stanford University Hospital is only fifty miles away. Furthermore, Marin General Hospital and its associated medical organizations are among the best in the country. So, right away, I feel that I am blessed to be living here.

Secondly, I am a person with a deep spiritual commitment. My orientation is Buddhist, and my interests lie in Interactive Guided Imagery1 (mind stories), the enneagram, and conscious evolution. Being diagnosed with bladder cancer was a shock to my system of values, but the supportive community I live in combined with my Buddhist outlook has made this period of my life reasonably tolerable.

Micah age 7
Micah age 7

Thirdly, you should know that cancer runs rampant in my family. My father died of bladder cancer at the age of 86 and my mother died of another form of cancer at the age of 71. In addition, my son, Micah, now 47, survived a stage four Wilm’s Tumor (kidney cancer) which he had in 1976. The key to his survival may have been the use of some of the supplementary medical care techniques described later in this blog, as the surgeon had given him up for dead. Even my surgeon said, “We weren’t saving many stage fours in those days.” My son’s story was told in two episodes of “In Search of…” with Leonard Nimoy in 1976 and 1980.

Finally, my younger sister died of Leukemia in 1968 at the age of 27. With all of this happening, you might think that I was “predisposed” to get the curse.


PLEASE NOTE: This material is copyright(c) 1997-2016, by Dr. Jerome Freedman. All Rights Reserved.

This document is meant to be a description of the author’s experience and he in no way takes responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of any medical knowledge. The author assumes no responsibility for choices made by any of the readers of this material.

The author is not a physician and makes no claims about the potential usefulness of the subject matter herein to have any medical benefit. Please check with your doctor if you find something interesting that you would like to try.


[1] Interactive Guided Imagerysm is a service mark of The Academy for Guided Imagery, Mill Valley, CA.

 

Healing Cancer with Meditation Seminar

Did you know that 14 million people are diagnosed globally with cancer each year? (source: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

I am an 18+ year cancer survivor. My son is a 39 year cancer survivor. We experienced the Seven Principles of Mindfulness in Healing during our recovery. My new book, Healing with the Seven Principles of Mindfulness, How to Thrive and Succeed in a Complex Cancer System provides those with cancer healing methods that support integrative and traditional medicine.

jerome's seminar04

When you buy the book in the next 36 HOURS, you will receive FREE access to the “Healing Cancer with Meditation Seminar,” which you can attend:

1) LIVE and IN-PERSON on September 24, 2015, 6-9pm in Santa Monica, CA.

or

2) LIVE STREAM from anywhere in the world. (This will be recorded so you can access anytime.)

To get access the “Healing Cancer with Meditation Seminar,” BUY THE BOOK NOW, and follow the instructions to receive access and redeem your bonus(es).

You’ll be glad you did!

Indiegogo Campaign Expires Soon – Please Help

Dear Friends:

HBOOK005The Indiegogo campaign to give away free copies of Healing with the Seven Principles of Mindfulness: How to Thrive and Succeed in a Complex Cancer System ends on September 18. The book is ready for publication and will be launched in Santa Monica on September 24.

The indications from my presentation at the Club at Harbor Point on August 20 and the following endorsement from Dr. Kelly Turner, PhD are that the book will be a great success.

“Dr. Freedman speaks from experience, both as a cancer survivor himself, and the father of a Radical Remission cancer survivor. His book, “Healing with 7 Principles of Mindfulness” gives readers a nurturing, helping hand throughout the entire cancer journey, especially with regard to developing a meditation practice.”

-Kelly Turner, PhD, Author of the NYTimes Bestseller “Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds”

Will you please take a moment to visit http://igg.me/at/7 and make a contribution? After that, please forward this email to your contacts who might be interested in a book about healing cancer.

Thanks,

Jerome
-Jerome

Jerome Freedman, Ph. D.

Cancer Resources

Don't Ignore Your Suffering
Don’t Ignore Your Suffering – Thich Nhat Hanh

Here are the cancer resources we want to share, in no special order:

  1. Mindfulness in Healing

  2. Meditation Practices and Cancer

  3. Focused Ultrasound Foundation: Home

  4. GcMAF.eu and Chapter 19: GcMAF Therapy Guidelines – The GcMAF Book

  5. The Truth About Cancer

  6. Mind Stories Helped Cure Cancer

  7. A Cancer Cure – Gerson Therapy

  8. Meditation Helps Cure Cancer

  9. What Happened To Medical Choice?

  10. What’s Wrong With Our Healthcare System

  11. CBD Rich Strains – Synergy Wellness

  12. TrueNorth Health Center

  13. Marin Natural Medicine Clinic

These are enough to get you started. Let me know if you have any questions.

May you be safe from internal and external harm.
May you have a calm, clear mind and a peaceful, loving heart.
May you be strong, healthy, and vital.
May you experience love, joy, wonder, and wisdom in this life, just as it is!

Stop Cancer In Its Tracks

How to Embrace Mindfulness in Healing so that Healthy Cells Grow All by Themselves when You Allow for Healing and Well-being to Take Place

This Book Focuses on How to

  • unlock your mind’s ability to heal your body
  • explore alternatives to gold standard medical practices
  • consistently generate better ideas about your health care
  • practice mindful meditation like you want
  • be your own advocate for your treatment plan
download-pdf buy-book
Stop Cancer In Its Tracks

What is Mindfulness?

Sterling Silver Buddha
Sterling Silver Buddha
Sterling Silver Buddha | Collection of Jerome Freedman

We begin with the question: What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is the act of deliberately paying full attention to what is going on in the present moment without judgment. I’m sure you have experienced moments of mindfulness sometime in your life. These moments of mindfulness can come when you see a beautiful sunset or gaze down on your infant child in awe or in many other common circumstances. You know where you are and what you are doing. The only difference between mindfulness and what you do in everyday life is the quality of awareness. If you are eating something from a fast food restaurant on the run, this is not mindfulness. If you are carrying on a conversation with someone and your attention is on what you will be doing next, this is not mindfulness. But if you are listening to someone with your full attention as if there were nothing else to do in that moment, this is mindfulness.

I am reminded of the Japanese poem:

Sitting quietly,
Doing nothing,
Spring comes,
And the grass grows all by itself!

As the poem states, mindfulness in sitting quietly implies “doing nothing!” In order to achieve this, all you do is sit there!

When we are mindful, we know what we are experiencing in or body, feelings, mind and the contents of the mind. When we pay attention to what is going on in our body, we recognize the life force pulsating throughout our whole being. We recognize the miracle of being alive, which we usually take for granted.  Even so, the miracle is still here, nonetheless. At any moment, we can become aware of our breathing, whether at our nostrils, in our chest, or in our belly. When we do so, we return to the present moment. When we feel our heart beating in our chest or notice our pulse in our feet, legs, torso, arms, or head, we return to the present moment. When we are out in nature and notice the green leaves, flowers, birds, insects, rocks, yes, and even dog poo, we can return to the present moment.

Our feelings are also gateways to being present. Most of the time, we spend a lot of energy avoiding our feelings by watching TV, eating when we are not hungry, going shopping, or simply denying them. However, if we can experience our feelings in our feelings,they too, can be a doorway to being mindful in the present moment. You may ask, “What does it mean to experience our feelings in our feelings?” It means to simply experience our feelings directly, without adding our thoughts, opinions, judgments, criticisms, notions, or anything else to them. We have to let go and allow our inner wisdom to feel what we are feeling. From this, compassion for ourselves develops and we find more freedom of expression. Good explanation!

Our thoughts consist of images, impulses, feelings, memories, opinions and judgments, plans, worries, fixations, mental constructions, and self-talk– the constant chatter that goes on inside our minds. We also have moments of creativity and insight when we are concentrated on something we love or experience awe at a truly wonderful sight in nature. Our thoughts can get the best of us as they circuit around through our brain. However, with mindfulness, we can bring our mind back to our breath or our body and return to the present moment.